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Draft Form 706 for 2010 Decedents Reflects Law and Other Changes

August 8, 2011

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The IRS has released drafts of Form 706, United States Estate (and Generation-Skipping Transfer) Tax Return for estates of decedents dying after Dec. 31, 2009 and before Jan. 1, 2011, and its instructions. They reflect law changes made by the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization and Job Creation Act of 2010 (2010 Tax Relief Act), as well as indexing and other changes. Form 706 must be filed by the executor of any estate of a decedent dying in 2010 whose gross estate, plus adjusted taxable gifts and specific exemption is more than $5,000,000. Alternatively, for decedents dying in 2010, the estate may elect not have the estate tax apply, but rather to apply modified carryover basis treatment to property acquired or passing from the decedent. If such election is made, the executor would not file a Form 706, but rather the IRS has indicated that such election will be made

IRS Extends Form 8939 Deadline

August 5, 2011

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IRS Extends Form 8939 Deadline

August 5, 2011

Authored by: Stephanie Moll

The Internal Revenue Service issued guidance today on the treatment of basis for certain estates of decedents who died in 2010. The guidance assists executors who are making the choice to opt out of the estate tax and have the carryover basis rules apply. Form 8939, the basis allocation form required to be filed by executors opting out of the estate tax, is due Nov. 15, 2011.

No Good Deed Goes Unpunished?

When Christian Lopez caught Derek Jeter’s historic 3,000th hit on July 9, he most likely thought that he was just being a nice guy by giving it back to the Yankee shortstop. In that moment, Lopez probably didn’t realize that his incredibly selfless gesture could lead to potentially negative tax consequences.

Did Lopez give the ball to Jeter as a gift? That could mean that Lopez made a taxable gift equal to the fair market value of the ball. How much is that ball actually worth? Fair market value is defined as the price a willing buyer would pay a willing seller for the ball. You can buy an official Rawlings MLB baseball on amazon.com for $17.30. Chump change. However, some people are estimating that Lopez could have sold Jeter’s ball for up to $250,000. Now we’re talking

I am the parent of a child with special needs…

I am the parent of a child with special needs.  Should I give money to a relative to care for my child with special needs after my death instead of giving the money directly to my child?

No.

Your expressed desires to your relative about the money create only a moral obligation on your relative and are not legally binding obligations that can be enforced. Further, if the relative dies, divorces or has financial problems, your child’s lifestyle could be negatively affected. Specifically, in a divorce, your child’s monies may be considered part of the marital property and part or all may be awarded to your relative’s spouse. If the relative dies, the money passes into the relative’s estate and goes to his or her beneficiaries or heirs, which might not be your child. Also, if your relative has to declare bankruptcy, creditors could put a lien on your child’s monies.

New Georgia Trust Code Turns One; Reflections on the First Year

On July 1, 2010, the provisions of a completely revised Georgia trust code became effective. This month we celebrate its first anniversary, so it seemed to be a good time to reflect on what were the top “attention-getters” of the new code. In thinking about this “top three” list, we’re reminded of the last time we trained a new puppy. The theme was: reward the good behavior, ignore the bad. Fortunately, the new code will help you take care of your dog and rewards good trustee behavior, but there could be serious consequences for a trustee not complying with some of the new provisions.

The Elusive Insurable Interest Requirement

Life insurance is an important estate planning tool that many people buy to provide financial support for loved ones and to ensure that their estate will be able to pay estate taxes when they pass away.

The “Insurable Interest Requirement”. In the U.S., a life insurance policy can only be acquired by a person (or entity) who has an “insurable interest” in the life of the insured. This means the person who acquires the policy must have some reason to wish for the insured’s continued life. This requirement for an insurable interest originated in England in the 18th century when Parliament enacted a law requiring an insurable interest to stop the popular practice of wealth investors purchasing life insurance policies on elderly persons and persons accused of capital crimes so they could reap the profits when the person died (by natural or unnatural causes). This law remains in effect in

Portability: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

For years, estate planning practitioners have encouraged Congress to pass a bill authorizing portability of a married couple’s estate tax exemption (allowing a surviving spouse’s estate to add her deceased spouse’s unused estate tax exemption to her own). Now, with the passage of the Tax Relief, Unemployment Insurance Reauthorization and Job Creation Act of 2010 (the “2010 Act”), estate planning practitioners are now wondering if, instead of being grateful that Congress finally listened, they should be thinking “be careful what you wish for.” Here is our take on the good, the bad and the ugly of portability.

The Good:

Prior to the passage of the 2010 Act,

Building Family Philanthropy Through Private Foundations

July 21, 2011

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I’ve noticed a trend in our estate planning practice — an increasing interest in establishing private non-operating foundations. This is interesting given the advantage that donor-advised funds provide over foundations, most notably the reduced administrative burdens on a family who opts for donor-advised funds over foundations. There are also extremely well run donor-advised funds to pick from, funds with great track records and high customer satisfaction ratings. So what is the reasoning? I think it stems from a desire of a parent to teach philanthropy to their children, grandchildren, and possibly great-grandchildren. Family members are typically on the board of directors of the foundation so they are forced to come together and make decisions about how grants are made. The hope is having family members convening in one place and spending time discussing charitable gifts will provide a springboard for other charitable giving. Even though the foundation document

I am the parent of a child with special needs. Why is it so important for me to have a Will?

To ensure your estate is distributed according to your wishes.

If you die without a will and have assets in your own name, your assets will pass by your state’s law of “intestate succession,” which sets forth who in your family will receive your estate and in what order. This distribution may be contrary to your wishes and may result in your child being denied eligibility for public benefits (generally, an individual may not receive SSI or Medicaid if they have more than $2,000 in assets). For example, if you die without a will in some jurisdictions, the law requires your assets be divided between your spouse and your child, even though you may want your assets to go to your child only if your spouse is not alive. In addition, a court would have to appoint a legal guardian that is accountable to the court to invest and manage your minor

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