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Yet One More Word on New York Estate Taxes

Yet One More Word on New York Estate Taxes

August 3, 2015

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich, Karin Barkhorn and Edward Peck

ThinkstockPhotos-466616312The New York State Department of Taxation and Finance recently issued a Technical Memorandum explaining the 2015 legislative amendments to the major New York State estate tax reform provisions enacted in 2014 and reported on this blog last year. The amendments are all effective retroactive to April 1, 2015.

The amendments made clear that the following tax tables are permanent.

Basic Estate Tax Exclusion Amount increases are to be phased in as follows for New York residents or non-residents owning real property located in New York State during the period listed:

 

 

April 1, 2014 – March 31. 2015: $2,062,500;

April 1, 2015 – March 31, 2016: $3,125,000;

April 1. 2016 – March 31, 2017: $4,187,500;

April 1, 2017 –

Proposal to Reform New York State Estate Tax System

Proposal to Reform New York State Estate Tax System

January 26, 2015

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

177572431As reported on this blog last year, New York State modified its estate tax system by gradually increasing the estate tax exemption along with some other changes. The hope and intent were to keep New York State’s estate tax more competitive and in line with other states within the country to prevent a migration of New Yorkers from the state to avoid state estate tax. However, the language in the New York State stature which made these modifications created some significant problems for New Yorkers. The New York State Society of Certified Public Accountants, through its Estate Planning Committee, has proposed some additional reforms to the New York tax law (the “Proposal”) which attempt to eliminate some of the perceived unfairness in current New York law.

As it currently stands, for a New Yorker

Update: New York Budget Bill Makes Changes to Estate Tax Law

Update: New York Budget Bill Makes Changes to Estate Tax Law

September 9, 2014

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich

statuteofliberty  Update: New York State’s Department of Taxation and Finance recently released a summary of the changes made to New York’s estate tax law earlier this year which were previously reported on this blog.  As reported before these changes were rather significant and are worth repeating.

Do You Know Which States are Trying to Tax Your Trust?

451594605In an environment in which states are continuously searching for methods of increasing tax revenues, a major consideration for any settlor, beneficiary or trustee of a trust should be where the trust might be subject to income tax. The days of a trust being taxed in the state where it has its “principal place of administration” are quickly fading, as we enter into a new era in which states are increasing attempting to tax trusts with minimal contacts to the jurisdiction.

New York Budget Bill Makes Changes to Trust Income Tax

New York Budget Bill Makes Changes to Trust Income Tax

April 16, 2014

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

The New York Budget bill made changes not only in the estate tax arena, as previously reported on this blog, but also to the income taxation of certain trusts.

Under law prior to the passage of the Budget bill, a resident trust created by a New Yorker was entirely exempt from New York income tax if there was (i) no New York resident trustee, (ii) no assets located in New York and (iii) no New York source income. The new law, effective for calendar years beginning January 1, 2014, provides that a New York resident beneficiary receiving a distribution of income from a New York State resident trust which is exempt from New York State income tax, will be taxed on that “accumulated distribution”. The new accumulation distribution tax, will not apply if the accumulated income was earned before 2014 or if the trust itself is subject to New

New York Budget Bill Makes Changes to Estate Tax

New York Budget Bill Makes Changes to Estate Tax

April 8, 2014

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

statuteoflibertyAs previously reported on this blog, Governor Cuomo and the New York State legislature, both Assembly and Senate, were busy at work on the budget which contained modifications for the trusts and estates arena. A bill has finally been passed, which looks different from some of the earlier proposals. The new bill impacts the estate and trust world as follows:

Basic Estate Tax Exclusion Amount increases are to be phased in as follows for New York residents or non-residents owning real property located in New York State during the period listed:

 

 

 

  • April 1, 2014 – March 31, 2015 – $2,062,500;
  • April 1, 2015 – March 31, 2016 – $3,125,000;
  • April 1. 2016 – March 31, 2017 – $4,187,500;
  • April 1, 2017 – December 31, 2018 –

Madness in March?

Madness in March?

March 14, 2014

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

The term March Madness may take on new significance to New Yorkers this year. In addition to contributing to NCAA pools, New Yorkers should consider making gifts this month. Following up on prior blog post, New Yorkers may have a very small window of opportunity to take advantage of gifting significant sums of money prior to April 1, 2014. Currently New York State has no gift tax. New Yorkers can make gifts of any size to anyone without incurring any New York gift tax consequences at all. However, the gift and estate tax rules may change shortly. Governor Cuomo has proposed a change to New York’s estate and gift tax law that will require all taxable gifts made by a New York resident after March 31, 2014 to be included as part of the gross estate for purposes of calculating the New York estate tax. However, the proposal would

Proposals to Change New York State Transfer Tax System

Proposals to Change New York State Transfer Tax System

January 13, 2014

Authored by: Stacie J. Rottenstreich and Karin Barkhorn

There is has been much talk recently about changing the New York State estate and gift tax structure. Currently, New York State estate tax is based on Federal law from 1998.  New York State imposes a state estate tax on estates valued at $1M. Just this week Governor Cuomo proposed increasing the estate tax threshold from the current $1M to $5.25M and lowering the top estate tax rate to 10% over the next four years. His hope would be that beginning in 2019, the New York State estate tax exemption would equal the Federal exemption, which is indexed to inflation.  This plan would ultimately exempt nearly 90% of estates from New York state estate tax and would eliminate any incentive for New Yorkers to move out of state and migrate to states with no estate tax imposed on its residents.

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