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How Reproductive Technology Can Affect Your Estate Plan in Unforeseen Ways

On August 29, 2011, the 8th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in St. Louis held that an eight-year-old Iowa girl born two years after her father died is not eligible to receive his Social Security benefits.   If your grandmother, like mine, would have thought it was fishy that a child was born less than nine months after a wedding, imagine her reaction to learning that a child was born two years after the father’s death!

But with the use of assisted reproductive technology, like in vitro fertilization and artificial insemination, it IS now possible for a baby to be born more than 9 months after a parent dies. The use of assisted reproductive technology means that, if a parent preserves his or her genetic material (his sperm, her eggs, or their

Intentionally Defective Irrevocable Trusts: A Great Way to Transfer Wealth, Especially In Low Interest Rate Environments

The current low interest rate environment provides excellent opportunities to transfer wealth to family members.   One approach commonly used to accomplish this goal is to sell assets to an intentionally defective irrevocable trust (“IDIT”).  An IDIT is an irrevocable trust for the benefit of someone other than the creator of the trust (the “Settlor”), perhaps Settlor’s descendants.  However, the “intentionally defective” component of the IDIT means that, for income tax purposes, the assets in the trust will continue to be treated as owned by Settlor.  Thus, Settlor’s sale of assets to the IDIT will not result in income tax consequences.   Additionally, Settlor’s payment of income taxes on the income earned by the IDIT provides an additional means of reducing Settlor’s taxable estate, while allowing the benefits of the income earned by the IDIT to benefit Settlor’s descendants.

Typically, Settlor will take back a promissory note for the assets

Why Do I need a Trust?

August 24, 2011

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Why Do I need a Trust?

August 24, 2011

Authored by: Alan Singer

In light of the increase in the estate tax exemption to $5,000,000, several clients of mine asked why they need a Revocable Trust if they don’t need advanced tax planning (at least in their minds).   The following discusses some of the reasons for doing so.

What is a Revocable Trust?

A Revocable Trust (also known as a “living trust” or an “inter-vivos trust”), is a legal arrangement in which the creator (referred to as a “grantor” or “settlor”) transfers, during life, all (or part) of his or her assets to a Trustee to be managed and administered pursuant to the terms designated in the trust until fully distributed to the beneficiary or beneficiaries.

Estate Planning for Digital Assets

What are digital assets? Generally speaking, “digital assets” are any type of data in which a person has some right or proprietary interest.  A person’s digital assets may include (but are not limited to) information in his or her email accounts, information saved on his or her Smartphones, his or her computer files, picture files, video files, music files, social networking accounts, blogs, websites, word processing documents, and spreadsheets. 

Do digital assets have value?  Many digital assets have value.  Like tangible assets, digital assets can have monetary value (for example, blogs that generate revenue, or intellectual property rights, which – in some cases – may be extremely valuable), or sentimental value (family photos or video files, for example).  For this reason, it is important to establish a plan for what should happen to your digital assets in the event of your death or incapacity.  It may be necessary to access the digital

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