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When a Woman Loves a Woman (With Apologies to Percy Sledge…): Another Federal Judge Strikes Down DOMA

The year was 1963, the restaurant Portofino – an eclectic restaurant in Greenwich Village, a part of New York City known as one of the centers of the gay and lesbian liberal movement. It was this night that Edie Windsor met Thea Spyer. “We immediately just fit,” said Thea, in the award-winning 2009 documentary film, Edie and Thea: A Very Long Engagement by Susan Muska and Greta Olafsdotir. After sharing their lives together as a couple in New York City for 44 years, the two women wed in Canada, where same-sex marriage was legal. Two years later, Thea died of complications of multiple sclerosis. At that time the Defense of Marriage Act (“DOMA”), a 1996 federal statute, took effect, transforming Edie’s story from a personal tragedy to a public trial.

A Will Is Not Enough: An Estate Planning Lesson from Whitney Houston’s Passing

A recent Forbes.com article speculates that Whitney Houston’s estate will be worth anywhere between $10 and $20 million, or more. However, throughout her career, Houston has signed $100 million record deals and $10 million movie contracts for her roles in Blockbuster hits such as “The Bodyguard” and “The Preacher’s Wife.” Houston also completed the filming of “Sparkle” which is scheduled to be released in September of this year. Surely, with sound marketing, branding of Houston’s image, and increased record sales, her estate can bring in millions more in the upcoming years. Zach Greenburg, Forbes writer, said although Whitney Houston may not match Michael Jackson’s postmortem earnings, her artist royalties alone could bring the estate more than $10 million in the next year. Here’s an

Florida’s New Power of Attorney Act

Florida’s new Power of Attorney Act contained in the Florida Statute, Chapter 709, went into effect October 1, 2011. The new statute will affect how attorneys draft, utilize, and enforce powers of attorney (“POA”). Some of the more significant provisions of this new legislation are discussed below.

What is a POA? A Power of Attorney is a writing in which an individual (the “principal”) grants authority to another individual (the “agent”) to act in place of the principal; each act performed by the agent pursuant to the Power of Attorney has the same effect and benefit to the principal and the principal’s successors in interest as if the principal had performed the act himself.

Why have a POA?

Having an executed Power of Attorney is important in situations where an accident or illness renders an individual incapable of making decisions for themselves. By having an attorney prepare a Power of

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